The Kitchen We’re Crushing on Right Now – Spring 2018

Kitchen Crush Spring
1. The 1928 Wedgewood stove looks small, but the oven is large enough for a turkey. It came from Buckeye Appliance in Stockton. 2. The under-sink cabinet features a trompe l’oeil cutout, with the bottom portion of the doors painted black to mimic a skirt. 3. The flooring is a linoleum product called Marmoleum. Made with linseed oil and wood shavings, linoleum was popular in the 1920s. The homeowner was nervous about the idea of a red floor, so Kakies mocked up a sample using sheets of red poster board with a black inlay—and she was sold. 4. To create the custom cream color for the walls, trim and cabinets, Kakies used an original Dutch Boy paint deck from the 1920s. 5. Kakies designed the island to look like an old-fashioned farm table, with a beadboard pie safe underneath. The top is made of zinc (very period appropriate) and the legs are quarter-sawn oak that were ebonized using a recipe from a 19th-century cabinetmaker.

The 1928 Wedgewood stove looks small, but the oven is large enough for a turkey. It came from Buckeye Appliance in Stockton. The under-sink cabinet features a trompe l’oeil cutout, with the bottom portion of the doors painted black to mimic a skirt. The flooring is a linoleum product called Marmoleum. Made with linseed oil and wood shavings, linoleum was popular in the 1920s. The homeowner was nervous about the idea of a red floor, so Kakies mocked up a sample using sheets of red poster board with a black inlay—and she was sold. To create the custom cream color for the walls, trim and cabinets, Kakies used an original Dutch Boy paint deck from the 1920s. Kakies designed the island to look like an old-fashioned farm table, with a beadboard pie safe underneath. The top is made of zinc (very period appropriate) and the legs are quarter-sawn oak that were ebonized using a recipe from a 19th-century cabinetmaker.

When it came time to remodel the kitchen of her 1926 bungalow in midtown Sacramento, Dale Blunden decided to embrace, not erase, the home’s vintage style. She instructed interior designer Franklin John Kakies to make the room look as if it could be original to the house. Kakies complied, coming up with a design that he terms a historical reimagining. “It’s rather more sophisticated than the original kitchen would have been,” he explains, “but very sympathetic to the period of the house.”

By Marybeth Bizjak
Photography by David Duncan Livingston

The Details
Design: Franklin John Kakies Contractor: Ed Westbrook, HOMEWRIGHT, INC. Cabinets: Mill Thirteen
Custom ice box: Fogbank Industrial Arts
Automotive paint finishes: Allan Shaw Restorations
Flooring: Waldo Bowers Floor Covering
Chrome plating: Sherm’s Custom Plating; San Joaquin Chrome

1. The 1928 Wedgewood stove looks small, but the oven is large enough for a turkey. It came from Buckeye Appliance in Stockton.

2. The under-sink cabinet features a trompe l’oeil cutout, with the bottom portion of the doors painted black to mimic a skirt.

3. The flooring is a linoleum product called Marmoleum. Made with linseed oil and wood shavings, linoleum was popular in the 1920s. The homeowner was nervous about the idea of a red floor, so Kakies mocked up a sample using sheets of red poster board with a black inlay—and she was sold.

4. To create the custom cream color for the walls, trim and cabinets, Kakies used an original Dutch Boy paint deck from the 1920s.

5. Kakies designed the island to look like an old-fashioned farm table, with a beadboard pie safe underneath. The top is made of zinc (very period appropriate) and the legs are quarter-sawn oak that were ebonized using a recipe from a 19th-century cabinetmaker.

Kitchen Crush

The living room, with its Roche Bobois sofas and iconic Womb Chair by Eero Saarinen, provides a serene setting for this busy family to relax together.

6. Local company Strom Plumbing made the wall-mounted faucets, which are copies of an American Standard faucet from the late ’20s.

7. In the laundry area, Kakies repurposed an old galvanized pail as a utility sink. Hanging above the sink: a pair of framed photos of Blunden’s husband, Tom Marx, as a child bathing in a galvanized laundry tub.

Kitchen Crush icebox and wall scones

8. The icebox is a “total conceit,” says Kakies. Underneath is a panel-ready Sub-Zero fridge and freezer. A master machinist fabricated the doors, which were painted by a man who restores vintage cars. The hardware was scavenged from an old Electrolux icebox. Freezer pulls were carved out of blocks of solid brass, and the chrome plating was done by a plater who specializes in “show chrome.”

9. Original art-deco wall sconces came from a hotel in the Midwest.

 

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